Hot-Dog Coleslaw

Sometimes you just have to bend and serve junk food at home. At least the kids will eat it!

Straight to recipe

We all have a preference when it comes to how or what constitutes the “right” way for a hot dog. Whether its tomato ketchup or no-ketchup (Chicago); what sort of mustard – American, wholegrain, French, German, hot English; what sort of sausage -pork, beef, mystery meat or vegan. What sort of bun, crispy baguette, soft white roll, single slice of bread folded over (the Aussie way) or no bread at all. Even to how the roll is opened to put the sausage.

I once had a poster of the ‘World’s hotdogs” and the familiar shape was just one of 40 or so variants. If I can find it again, I will perhaps make a few of the more interesting ones in future posts.

However, that discussion I will save for another time. This post is merely about a recent hotdog as seen above and specifically the coleslaw I paired with it. Note this was far from a high cuisine meal, but a “Keep the kids happy as we rush from work” special.

Firstly the sausage and roll were just the regular supermarket home brand, nothing fancy and were they not my kids’ favourite, I would perhaps steer clear. I heated a grill pan in the oven at 210C, and baked the sausages for 8 mins, turn and 8 mins more, then served immediately. The hot chips (fries) were the frozen oven type and baked in the oven with the sausages.

With roughly quarter of an hour to prepare the rest, I split the bread rolls along the top, only three-quarters through, so the filling is not lost, and also so it can be seen and presents well. A side sliced bun in my opinion turns this into a sandwich.

So to the coleslaw. No exact measurements, for this as it was a throw together thing, use your best judgement and personal taste to guide you if you wish to make it at home.

Recipe

1/4 head Red Cabbage
1 Carrot
100g hard cheese – I used an Australian cheese similar to Cheddar
1/2 a red onion
2 tablespoon mayonnaise
1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
Salt and pepper

  • Remove the hard core from the cabbage by cutting the white triangle shape of the root with a good knife.
  • Take the outer few leaves and lay on the chopping board, and shred fairly thin, to around 2mm each slice and place in a large bowl.
    • repeat with the inner leaves, being careful as there will be thicker sections to shred.
  • Peel and finely slice the onion, and add to the cabbage
  • Wash and grate the carrot (no need to peel) directly into the same bowl
  • Grate the cheese and add about half along with the mustard, mayo and then mix well.
    • Depending on the size of the cabbage and carrot, as well as personal preference, you may need more mayo. Though I recommend not too much as it will become messy in the Hotdog.
  • Check the seasoning, and then construct the hotdog
  • into the open bun, place the sausage, some of the slaw, then add more grated cheese and in my preference both tomato ketchup and American mustard
  • Serve with the chips and enjoy

Published by VinceHomeMade

With a decade of experience in the commercial kitchens of London and more than three times that cooking with my family, I am now going to share what I have learned along the way. Whether it's a recipe for shortcrust pastry; a pro-tip on buying or using chef's knives; a review of a new ingredient or a new take on an old one. It will be all here as I start this blog journey, in text, pictures and video links to my Instagram and YouTube page. If you would like to help me on this journey perhaps you would click on the link to "Buy me a coffee"

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