ANZAC Biscuits

ANZAC Biscuits
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This recipe is our family’s interpretation of the Australian and New Zealand classic biscuit.

ANZAC

The origins of the ANZAC biscuit and even the name are all well documented and I shall only briefly repeat them here. It should be noted that the names ‘ANZAC‘ and ‘ANZAC biscuit‘ are protected in both Australian and New Zealand law. The more detailed history of the biscuit, how it was named, where it came from and even the discussion of whether it is to be soft or hard can all be found online.

ANZAC stands for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, founded in 1914 as part of the First World War. The biscuit itself was one that could be fairly easily made by wives or loved ones from pantry staples, and arrive still edible to the serving troops after the long sea voyage to Europe.

More than a century later, these biscuits are still made regularly at homes across Australia and New Zealand and especially to honour the 25th April ANZAC Day Memorial to servicemen and servicewomen from all wars and conflicts since.

ANZAC Biscuits ready for the oven

Recipe Notes

As I mention, ANZAC Biscuits are protected, and the recipes are very limited in variation while remaining to the original. Below are a few notes to help you when making these.

One common variation is the use of self-raising flour. This can be switched to plain, for a firmer biscuit but I am assured that the slightly lighter option is generally preferred.

I would not recommend swapping the golden syrup for say honey, maple syrup, treacle or molasses. While as a baked item it would possibly work, the taste will be different and it will most certainly not be a true ANZAC. If you can not find golden syrup in your regular store, check an Anglophile type store selling goods from the UK or Australia. It is certainly worth the effort, and you might get a few other tasty goodies while you are there.

The oats should really be Rolled oats, the other types available such as steel-cut or quick oats may work, but just as with the golden syrup, changing will give a different taste and feel.

ANZAC Biscuit ready for the oven

The crisp or soft debate of the ANZAC biscuit is solved simply; The biscuits should be crisp, or they will not survive the sea voyage. However, in our house, our kids and visitors prefer the softer chewier biscuits to crisp ones, also they barely travel further than the living room. For the proper crisper bake, just leave them in the oven for 2 to 3 minutes more than the recipe below says, mindful that they do not darken too much.

As for size, you may wish to make smaller ones, we often do, for lunch boxes or to give to smaller children. Simply make half-size balls of dough, and bake for about 10 to 12 minutes instead. This will give a yield of up from 24 to 48 biscuits.

ANZAC Biscuits

ANZAC Biscuits

Course: Biscuits, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: Australian, Classic
Keyword: ANZAC, bake, Biscuit, Biscuits, butter, golden syrup, traditional
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Cooling time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Servings: 24 biscuits
Calories: 2809kcal
Author: Traditional
A sweet buttery biscuit of rolled oats and golden syrup,
Print Recipe

Equipment

  • 1 Measuring Cups/Spoons
  • 1 Mixing bowl
  • 1 Sieve
  • 1 wooden spoon
  • 1 Small saucepan Milkpan or similar
  • 2 Baking Tray
  • 2 Silicone baking mat Optional but preferred

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Rolled Oats
  • ½ Cup Plain Flour
  • ½ Cup Self Raising Flour Can be swapped for plain for a harder biscuit
  • 1 Cup Brown sugar Firmly packed
  • ½ Cup Desiccated Coconut
  • ½ Cup Butter
  • Tblsp Golden Syrup
  • 3 Tblsp Water
  • ½ Teasp Bicarbonate of Soda

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 160°Celsius, 320°Fahrenheit, Gas 2-3, Moderate to Slow
  • Sift the two flours into the mixing bowl, add the rolled oats, sugar and coconut, Stir to combine and remove any lumps from the sugar.
    1 Cup Rolled Oats, ½ Cup Plain Flour, ½ Cup Self Raising Flour, ½ Cup Desiccated Coconut, 1 Cup Brown sugar
  • Place the butter in the pan with the golden syrup and water, place on low heat and stir continually until the butter melts.
    ½ Cup Butter, 2½ Tblsp Golden Syrup, 3 Tblsp Water
  • Stir the bicarbonate of soda into the liquid and mix well to allow it to react
    ½ Teasp Bicarbonate of Soda
  • While still foaming pour the warm syrup mixture into the dry ingredients and mix thoroughly to combine into a dough.
  • Take a tablespoon piece of dough and roll it into a ball, then press it onto the baking tray lined with either baking paper or the baking mats.
  • Repeat with the remaining dough, allowing a 2cm space around each biscuit. Aim for 12 on each tray.
  • Bake one tray at a time for 15 minutes until golden in colour and feel firm.
  • Allow them to cool directly on the tray for about 15 minutes.
  • Can be stored in an airtight container away from bright light for several weeks, but I doubt that you will be able to resist for that long.
    ANZAC Biscuits
Tried this recipe?Please mention @vincehomemade or tag #wprecipemaker

Nutrition

Nutrition Facts
ANZAC Biscuits
Amount per Serving
Calories
2809
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
126
g
194
%
Saturated Fat
 
84
g
525
%
Trans Fat
 
4
g
Polyunsaturated Fat
 
6
g
Monounsaturated Fat
 
27
g
Cholesterol
 
244
mg
81
%
Sodium
 
1364
mg
59
%
Potassium
 
973
mg
28
%
Carbohydrates
 
403
g
134
%
Fiber
 
18
g
75
%
Sugar
 
247
g
274
%
Protein
 
29
g
58
%
Calcium
 
283
mg
28
%
Vitamin C
 
1
mg
1
%
Vitamin A
 
2838
IU
57
%
Iron
 
10
mg
56
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Published by VinceHomeMade

With a decade of experience in the commercial kitchens of London and more than three times that cooking with my family, I am now going to share what I have learned along the way. Whether it's a recipe for shortcrust pastry; a pro-tip on buying or using chef's knives; a review of a new ingredient or a new take on an old one. It will be all here as I start this blog journey, in text, pictures and video links to my Instagram and YouTube page. If you would like to help me on this journey perhaps you would click on the link to "Buy me a coffee"

2 thoughts on “ANZAC Biscuits

  1. Dorothy's New Vintage Kitchen – I'm a writer, cook, gardener, photographer, poet, quilter, and accomplished daydreamer. I'm also a wife, mother, grandmother, sister. cousin, aunt, and friend, no particular order on any given day. I've been a writer all my life, newspaper reporter and columnist, radio news writer, and magazine contributor, and poet and short-story writer as the spirit moves. Now, I turn my attention to my cookbook, the blog, and a cooking column "Memorable Meals," which runs in our county newspaper. I love dogs, cats, and my never-dwindling pile of books I intend to read. Our family ran a small Vermont Inn for 18 years, with our focus on local, organic ingredients. After many years of daily serving up of our local delicacies, cooking classes, and catering, we are now only open for special events, cooking classes, etc. We also host musicians and artists, having helped produce a musical festival and other musical events for nearly 20 years. Many incredible artists have found a place at our table. Wonderful experiences, we will treasure always. My family and friends are my practice subjects. With a family that includes nut, peanut, tree fruit, and vegetable allergies, gluten intolerance, dairy intolerance, vegetarians, vegans, heart conscious, and a couple of picky eaters, there has to be a few quick tricks in the book to keep everyone fed and happy! Personally, I do not eat red meat or most dairy (usually) for health reasons, making the occasional exception at Thanksgiving or our anniversary if the duck is locally raised. I do eat fish and seafood, so I try to come up with alternatives and substitutions when available. I serve local organic eggs and cheeses to my family who can tolerate dairy (I need to watch my own cholesterol so I am careful, but have been known to let a little piece of really good cheese accidentally fall on my plate!). I cook by the seasons and draw on inspiration from the strong and talented women in my family who came before me as well as the youth in the family who look at the world with fresh eyes. Food links us all, whether sharing a meal, cooking it together, or writing about it for others to enjoy. I love taking an old recipe and giving it a modern spin, especially if I can make it a littler healthier and use foods that are kinder to the Earth and to our bodies. I believe strongly in sustainable, delicious eating of whole foods! And finally, I love conversing with all the talented cooks and chefs out there who dot the globe! It's a wonderful, world full of culinary penpals, and I cherish them all! XXXOOO
    Dorothy's New Vintage Kitchen says:

    These looks tasty!

    1. VinceHomeMade – Australia – With a decade of experience in the commercial kitchens of London and more than three times that cooking with my family, I am now going to share what I have learned along the way. Whether it's a recipe for shortcrust pastry; a pro-tip on buying or using chef's knives; a review of a new ingredient or a new take on an old one. It will be all here as I start this blog journey, in text, pictures and video links to my Instagram and YouTube page. If you would like to help me on this journey perhaps you would click on the link to "Buy me a coffee"
      VinceHomeMade says:

      Please try them, they really are

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